Archive

Archive for July, 2006

Talking about “Scandals”!

July 31st, 2006 No comments
You've heard it over the radio, seen it on television, on cellphones and crawled "the web" like crazy. This generation has the Tech that's why. I guess you've heard it all but not this one.... and I never thought it would happen in my Internet Cafe! Walahh! Hold your horses! Behold... The "Saintdune Scandal"!!! You dont believe me? Here's the link... WARNING! Viewer discretion advised... Saintdune Scandal
Categories: Blogs, General, Personal Tags:

Marlon Manalo sa 2006 IPT North American Open

July 31st, 2006 No comments

Panalo ang German na si Thorsten "The Hitman" Hohmann laban kay Marlon "Marvelous" Manalo sa 2006 IPT 8-Ball Championship na hinold sa The Venetian Hotel sa Las Vegas, Nevada nung Linggo. Ipinanalo ni Hohmann ang walo sa 15 racks at inuwi ang $350,000ng grand prayz.

 
Bago makapasok sa faynals, tinalo ni Manalo ang kapwa Filipino na sina Efren "Bata" Reyes at Dennis Orcollo. Tinalo rin nya ang Russian na si Evgeny Stalev at German na si Ralf Souquet. Tanging si Hohmann lang ang tumalo sa kanya sa elimination round.

Tumanggap ng $99,000 si Manalo para sa pangalawang pwesto. Ang kababayang sina Orcollo (pumangatlo) at Reyes (pumang-apat) ay magkahiwalay na tumanggap ng $80,000 at $65,000. Si Soquet na pumang-lima ay nakakuha ng $50,000 at si Stalev na pumang-anim ay nakakuha ng $40,000.

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Agnus Press releases first book by veteran Bikol poet

July 31st, 2006 No comments

by Jose Jason Chancoco

Prize-winning writer and Ford Foundation scholar H. Francisco V. Peñones will finally launch his first-ever title. Under a new Publishing Firm, the Agnus Press, Ragang Rinaranga will showcase 52 Iriganon poems along with their English translations.

Also a distinguished visual and performance artist, Peñones was a UP National Writers Workshop fellow for Bikol poetry. His works have appeared in Asiaweek, Ani, Mantala, HomeLife, Hingowa, Bangraw, Salugsog sa Sulog and other important publications and journals. He runs a column for the Bikol Reporter and edits its Bikol poetry section. He has won the Pedro Sabido Award for Creative Writing, Sumagang Award, Catholic Mass Media Award and the Premio Tomas Arejola para sa Literaturang Bikolnon.

Launchings will be held on August 10, 2pm at the Iriga City Hall and on August 11, 6pm at Lolo's Bar, Avenue Square, Naga City.
Categories: Blogs, News, Personal Tags:

Sa Malabsay

July 31st, 2006 No comments
igwang tingog

an hulog

kan tubig.




An si’wag

nagbihag

sa nagnamit




kan gayon,

asin sasambiton,

“abang hamis.�












In Malabsay






there is voice

in the falling

of water.




Its splash

seized

the one who tasted




beauty,

and utters,

“sweet.”
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

Pat & Richa

July 31st, 2006 No comments

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hello earth! found the time to post again…anyhoo, we just covered Pat & Richa’s wedding yesterday…got amazing keepers from the pre nup…got amazing shots from the wedding too!

the bride is actually the sister of my bestfriend (James)…felt very comfortable covering the wedding–no creative hindrance or whatsoever…hehe :)

Categories: Blogs, Personal, Pictures Tags:

Bridging the ideal and the real

July 30th, 2006 No comments
ON SECOND thought, the question was not unfortunate at all as it brings the OFW issue to the fore: Should not a high level of population growth be desirable since it enables us to have excess labor that will fill the needs of developed economies and in the process sustain the county's growth through their remittances?

Dr. Alejandro Herrin of the UP School of Economics dismissed the idea from a fellow economist, positing it against the question: Should sending OFWs who mostly do menial jobs in the developing world be a proper national goal?

This reminded me of a definition of "human security" advanced by one of the participants in the UP policy dialogue I attended last Tuesday, who said he is a veteran of the First Quarter Storm in the early '70s: It is only attained when the Philippines no longer has to send nurses and caregivers who will wipe the asses of their aging patients in the West.

On the one hand, these points are OK until we come to grips again with the harsh reality in the Philippines today: exporting labor has become a national policy because we cannot give our people enough decent jobs in local shores. And their combined remittances are what actually keeps our economy afloat amidst the massive waves of debt piled up by the succession of regimes starting with Marcos.

But on the other, Dr. Herrin's and the FQS veteran's position represent an ideal that we should not let slip away. The question asked of him implies perpetuating the status quo interminably, which is simply unacceptable. At the very least, we owe it to these OFWs to build a better country, or at least a better city or community, that they will return to when the time comes to go back home.

Our challenge is to become a sort of Will Allen Dromgoole's Bridge Builders in our own little way: able to bridge the ideal and the real in our respective nook and cranny of the Philippines.

Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

Bridging the ideal and the real

ON SECOND thought, the question was not unfortunate at all as it brings the OFW issue to the fore: Should not a high level of population growth be desirable since it enables us to have excess labor that will fill the needs of developed economies and in the process sustain the county's growth through their remittances?



Dr. Alejandro Herrin of the UP School of Economics dismissed the idea from a fellow economist, positing it against the question: Should sending OFWs who mostly do menial jobs in the developing world be a proper national goal?



This reminded me of a definition of "human security" advanced by one of the participants in the UP policy dialogue I attended last Tuesday, who said he is a veteran of the First Quarter Storm in the early '70s: It is only attained when the Philippines no longer has to send nurses and caregivers who will wipe the asses of their aging patients in the West.



On the one hand, these points are OK until we come to grips again with the harsh reality in the Philippines today: exporting labor has become a national policy because we cannot give our people enough decent jobs in local shores. And their combined remittances are what actually keeps our economy afloat amidst the massive waves of debt piled up by the succession of regimes starting with Marcos.



But on the other, Dr. Herrin's and the FQS veteran's position represent an ideal that we should not let slip away. The question asked of him implies perpetuating the status quo interminably, which is simply unacceptable. At the very least, we owe it to these OFWs to build a better country, or at least a better city or community, that they will return to when the time comes to go back home.



Our challenge is to become a sort of Will Allen Dromgoole's Bridge Builders in our own little way: able to bridge the ideal and the real in our respective nook and cranny of the Philippines.


Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

Population, development and the conflicted individ…

July 30th, 2006 No comments
ON THE whole, it was a good idea that I managed to attend, even if partly, yesterday's Bicol Regional Symposium Population and Development at the Arrupe Convention Hall in Ateneo de Naga University in spite of our jarring trip to Manila and back, courtesy of the Camarines Sur section of Quirino (now Rolando Andaya) Highway.

The exchanges in the morning, limited as they were by time constraints, illustrate the conflicts Catholic Filipinos face in regard to family planning.

Anjo Llorin, formerly with Ateneo de Naga and now working with the Family Planning Organization of the Philippines, asked if his working with FPOP is a sin, in the context of a provision in the Vatican II document prescribing that sons and daughters of the church may not undertake blameworthy methods of birth control. Bernadette Gumba, chair of the social science department of the Ateneo College of Arts and Sciences, highlighted the gender issue attending the debate, anchored on a woman's choice by virtue of her reproductive rights.

What I found extremely interesting is the fact that progressive elements of the Catholic Church, represented by Fr. John Carroll of the Ateneo de Manila University who was one of the panelists, agree with what experts have been saying: the country's rapid population growth has a negative impact on economic growth, more so among the poor. Dr. Alejandro Herrin of the UP School of Economics essentially said the same thing in his presentation, among other key messages. I also recalled Fr. Carroll went as far as agreeing that sex education should be discussed in schools, but not at the elementary level.

The problems starts with how this is reconciled with Church teachings at the operational level. Although I did not hear Fr. Peter Pojol's piece in the afternoon session, the way he responded to a query from the representative of the Population Commission Regional Office on the concept of informed choice made me very uneasy. Using killing and Internet pornography as analogies ("Do we now teach killing in the classroom?"), which to me did not make practical sense, it was the force of dogma being brought to bear on government efforts to precisely address our rapidly growing population. It is the same narrow perspective that has effectively killed an effort to educate public school students on the perils of increased sexual activity at an early age, which Solita Monsod railed about.

(Which led me to think, and this is not to disrespect Dr. Herrin who I found very authoritative and incisive on the subject, and straightforward too when called for, like the way he handled the unfortunate question on the OFW phenomenon of that Ateneo de Naga economist: Wouldn't Mareng Winnie have lent to a more balanced panel and a more colorful and engaging discussion that would have benefited the audience?)

What I am hopeful about is the presence of more reasoned voices like Fr. Carroll's, which need to reverberate more loudly both within the Church leadership and among its faithful. "Unfortunately, (the) Church has been more active in opposing contraception by political means than in forming consciences of its people or providing them with a choice. As a result, it is experiencing the worst of two worlds: it is blamed for the 'population problem,' and many of its people use methods not approved by it, including abortion."

And he probably is pointing us the way: through an involved Catholic Church focused on the education of couples; the strengthening of natural family planning (NFP, which the church-sanctioned alternative) at all levels; and openness to government assistance.
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

Population, development and the conflicted individual

ON THE whole, it was a good idea that I managed to attend, even if partly, yesterday's Bicol Regional Symposium Population and Development at the Arrupe Convention Hall in Ateneo de Naga University in spite of our jarring trip to Manila and back, courtesy of the Camarines Sur section of Quirino (now Rolando Andaya) Highway.

The exchanges in the morning, limited as they were by time constraints, illustrate the conflicts Catholic Filipinos face in regard to family planning.

Anjo Llorin, formerly with Ateneo de Naga and now working with the Family Planning Organization of the Philippines, asked if his working with FPOP is a sin, in the context of a provision in the Vatican II document prescribing that sons and daughters of the church may not undertake blameworthy methods of birth control. Bernadette Gumba, chair of the social science department of the Ateneo College of Arts and Sciences, highlighted the gender issue attending the debate, anchored on a woman's choice by virtue of her reproductive rights.

What I found extremely interesting is the fact that progressive elements of the Catholic Church, represented by Fr. John Carroll of the Ateneo de Manila University who was one of the panelists, agree with what experts have been saying: the country's rapid population growth has a negative impact on economic growth, more so among the poor. Dr. Alejandro Herrin of the UP School of Economics essentially said the same thing in his presentation, among other key messages. I also recalled Fr. Carroll went as far as agreeing that sex education should be discussed in schools, but not at the elementary level.

The problems starts with how this is reconciled with Church teachings at the operational level. Although I did not hear Fr. Peter Pojol's piece in the afternoon session, the way he responded to a query from the representative of the Population Commission Regional Office on the concept of informed choice made me very uneasy. Using killing and Internet pornography as analogies ("Do we now teach killing in the classroom?"), which to me did not make practical sense, it was the force of dogma being brought to bear on government efforts to precisely address our rapidly growing population. It is the same narrow perspective that has effectively killed an effort to educate public school students on the perils of increased sexual activity at an early age, which Solita Monsod railed about.

(Which led me to think, and this is not to disrespect Dr. Herrin who I found very authoritative and incisive on the subject, and straightforward too when called for, like the way he handled the unfortunate question on the OFW phenomenon of that Ateneo de Naga economist: Wouldn't Mareng Winnie have lent to a more balanced panel and a more colorful and engaging discussion that would have benefited the audience?)

What I am hopeful about is the presence of more reasoned voices like Fr. Carroll's, which need to reverberate more loudly both within the Church leadership and among its faithful. "Unfortunately, (the) Church has been more active in opposing contraception by political means than in forming consciences of its people or providing them with a choice. As a result, it is experiencing the worst of two worlds: it is blamed for the 'population problem,' and many of its people use methods not approved by it, including abortion."

And he probably is pointing us the way: through an involved Catholic Church focused on the education of couples; the strengthening of natural family planning (NFP, which the church-sanctioned alternative) at all levels; and openness to government assistance.
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

AT HOME WITH AUGUST

July 29th, 2006 No comments

August seems to be a poetic month for this blogger. Looking at my portfolio, it seems that many of my poems get printed during this month. It is as if we are being prepared for our beerday in September.

Incidentally, my poem “Sa Crime Lab” is printed in the August issue of Home Life Magazine edited by Palanca Hall of Famer Leoncio Deriada. Once again, there seems to be some typo errors but here’s the correct version:
 

  SA CRIME LAB
 

  Sinilip sa microscope
  ang silid

  ng batang babae
  na pinid

  na pinto ang bibig
  at patay na ilaw

  ang salita.
  Nakita sa likido
  ang higaan:

  Kinakain ng neutrophils
  ang gonorrhoea–di pa malusaw.

  Bago lumipat sa sunod
  na request, sinulat sa findings:

  Gram negative diplococci.

  –Jose Jason L. Chancoco
Also, my article “The Chanters of Baao” is scheduled for publication on August 7 (Monday) in the Life section of The Daily Tribune.

Meanwhile, more poems:
    

  PASAKALYE KAY KAYE I

  1. Baryo mang may piyesta,
      Subalit kung wala ka,
      Parang ibang planeta.

  2. Ika’y paralumang di ko man makita
      Sa antok ng gabi’t sigla ng umaga
      Subalit wari ko’y lagi kang kasama
      Tulad ng sampagang ang samyo’y amoy pa.

  3. Ako ay buntala, Sinta.
      Masusunog sa haraya
      At babagsak sa tumana:
      Sulyap mo lamang, sapat na.
 

  4. Mainit na sinapna,
      Pagmawuw ika uda,
      Namit itum na raga.

  5. Usipun kading buut,
      Mig-anud, migpadagus.
      Maulug man su upus,
      Diri pa matatapus.

  6. Pagmata, paturug,
      Pagsapuy, parigus,
      Pagkape, pagnaug–
      Puso ko, naglinug!

  7. Karusun man na kinudkud, 
      Bagong tigbas man na ubud,
      Dawa tubig man sa nuyug–
      Tam-is mo, Kaye, da kaarug!
 

  DESPEDIDA KI MANOY FRANK

  Ika Manoy Frank, Uragun.
  Ika liwanag sa diklum,
  Dawa bugas na tinutung,
  Talagang papuputiun.

  Diri sana magpabitik
  Sa mga blondieng babaknit
  Ta di matapus a thesis
  Ta ipasungkat ki misis!
 
    

Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

Honey

July 29th, 2006 No comments
Honey Daniels (Jessica Alba) is a struggling hiphop dancer who’s got all the moves, talent and relentless passion to succeed. She’s been waiting all her life to show the world her dance moves and now her dream is just a step away. Inspired by the energy and music and awesome dance moves ignite this exhilarating story of passion, determination and finding the courage to follow your dreams. Also starring Mekhi Phifer (8 Mile) and featuring hiphop sensations Missy Elliot and Lil’ Romeo.
My take: Get groovin’, chillin’, swayin’ and movin’ to hiphop-sexy bods-clubbin’-dreadlocks-bellybaring tees-nyc-thang! Friendship. Love. Career. Drugs. Kids. Dancing for a cause. It’s all here…almost.
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

Chances Are

July 29th, 2006 No comments
From “Dirty Dancing” director Emile Ardolino comes this heartwarming comedy that gives romance an unforgettable second chance…
Cybill Shepherd, Robert Downey Jr., Ryan O’Neal and Mary Stuart Masterson discover that life and love in the hereafter can present quite a predicament in Chances Are, the irresistible romantic comedy of two lifetimes. Cybill stars as Corinne Jeffries, a beautiful young woman whose picture-perfect marriage comes to a shattering halt when her husband Louie dies unexpectedly. Fortunately, Louie gets a second shot at life when he agrees to be “recycled� back to earth as the newborn Alex Finch (Robert Downey Jr). But fate crosses Alex’s path 23 years later when he meets Corinne’s daughter Miranda (Mary Stuart Masterson), and is suddenly flooded with a wealth of memories that all belong to Louie! Now, as Alex’s former existence slowly comes to life – he must confront a wife who thinks he’s dead, a daughter who could be his girlfriend and a best friend (Ryan O’Neal) who’s in love with Corinne.

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The Notebook

July 29th, 2006 1 comment
Behind every great love, is a great story…

A young woman comes to the coastal town of Seabrook, North Carolina in the 1940s to spend the summer with her family. Still in her teens, Allie Hamilton (Rachel McAdams) meets local boy Noah Calhoun (Ryan Gosling) at a Carnival. On the spot, Noah senses that he and Allie are meant to be together. Though she is a wealthy debutante and he a mill worker, over the course of one passionate and carefree summer in the South, the two fall deeply in love.


Circumstances and the sudden outbreak of World War II – drive them apart, but both continue to be haunted by memories of each other. When Noah returns home from the war years later, Allie is irrevocably gone from his life, but not from his heart.Though Noah doesn’t yet know it, Allie has come back to Seabrook, where they first fell in love. But now Allie is engaged to marry Lon (James Marsden), a wealthy soldier she met while volunteering in a GI hospital.


Decades later, a man (James Garner) reads from a faded notebook to a woman (Gena Rowlands) he regularly visits at her nursing home. Though her memory has faded, she becomes caught up in the fiery story of Allie and Noah – and for a few moments, she is able to relive the passionate, turbulent time when they swore they’d be together always.

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JARHEAD AND DEMOCRACY

July 28th, 2006 No comments

Watched a film–no not Superman Returns but something close to it (if trying to blow Iraq’s brains out is Supermanly)–Jarhead. Yes, a witty and magic realistic film on the Gulf War. We are not quite sure if the U.S. Marine Corps will simply say ‘hu haaa!’ to this and dismiss it as just another artsy anti-war flick. Watch it and tell it to the Marines.

Wanna join an essay contest? Here’s your chance. It is sponsored by the Ateneo Human Rights Center in partnership with Friedrich Naumann Foundation. Thesis question is: Does the universality of human rights require a particular type of democracy?

If you have an answer to this then by all means you are FREE to join.

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Pinoy Ubunteros

July 28th, 2006 No comments
I joined Ubuntu Philippines Team just recently and I was inspired to know that there are already bicolanos on the team (Zak and Irvin), both are actively involved in advocating Ubuntu and FOSS in general. I also was able to meet other Ubunteros from different parts of the archipelago virtually via irc.freenode.net’s #ubuntu-ph channel. The team [...]
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