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Archive for October, 2006

Bird Watching

October 31st, 2006 No comments
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Ano ang ispeling ng Czechoslovakia sa Tagalog?

October 31st, 2006 No comments

Isang malutong na WALA. Maging sa Filipino, ganun rin. Ang siste kasi, hiramin na lang ng buo at walang pagbabago ang mga praper nawn tulad ng pangalan isang bansa o teritori.

 Teka (kolowkyal ng 'hintay ka'), e bakit meron tayong  Estados Unidos, Dakilang Britanya, Tsina, Hapon at Pransya pero wala para sa Czechoslovakia, Turks and Caicos, Mozambique atbp? Porket ["porque at" (?)] ba wala tayong care, ugnayan o hindi natin alam na nag-iigzist pala ang mga bansang iyon, wala rin tayong panumbas na Filipinong tawag sa mga "iyon" (hindi "sa kanila")?

Kapansin-pansin o obvyuws na tanging ang mga bansang kaugnay sa Filipinas, sa ekonomi, palitiks atbp. lang ang may katumbas sa Tagalog (na pinagbeysan ng Filipino).

Nung ihold ang Olympic Games sa Athens, Greece nung 2004, bukod sa pangalang English ng mga bansang jumoyn sa palaro, nakalagay rin ang pangalang Greek ng mga bansa. Sa Miss Italia nel Mondo at Miss Tourism Queen International nitong nakaraang buwan, nasa Italian at Chinese ang nasa sas (sash) [sasy?] ng mga kontestant, respektivli. Gayun din sa mga internasyunal event na ginaganap sa South America, nasa kanilang wika.

Ang Pilipinas (nasa wikang Tagalog) sa [langwij] ay [katumbas]:  

Danish Filippinerne
Dutch Filipijnen
English Philippines
Finnish Filippiinit
French Philippines
German Philippinen
Greek Φιλιππίνες
Hungarian Fülöp-szigetek
Italian Filippine
Portuguese Filipinas
Spanish Filipinas
Swedish Filippinerna
Polish Filipiny
Russian Филиппины
Arabic الÙ?لبين
Japanese フィリピン

 

Merong tayong (Filipino-langwij) sariling alfabet at ortografing sinusunod kaya hindi imposibleng hindi tayo (Filipino-langwij) magkaroon ng sariling pangalan para sa mga pangalan ng mga bansa sa mundo.

Pangarap ko balang araw ang maging host din ang Filipinas ng Olympic Games pero bago iyon ang magkaroon ng Filipinong pangalan sa mga bansa sa mundo.

Pahabol: Nakasurvayv ako kay tayfon Milenyo at ngayon lang nakapagrekover ang Filipinayzd.i.ph!

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The toughest question on education (2)

October 31st, 2006 No comments
WHICHEVER way, I hope the accountability question will also include providing a reliable way of measuring improvement in student achievement, which I raised in this previous post.

I am part of an e-group that includes high-ranking officials from the DepEd, NEDA as well as our leading academic institutions in the country. I pretty much raised the same concern more than a month ago. The only response came from a UNICEF representative who said
You may argue that BEIS [Basic Education Information System] or the NAT [National Achievement Test] results have a lot of "noise" which makes them questionable and not credible. But I wonder which data base is totally free of any such "noise." Even the data supposedly gathered by the graduate students themselves may not be totally free of such problems. But I think this is where people in the academe and those in the reseach field can work more closely with DepED so that there is pressure to improve the integrity of data. Rather than treating the DepED data base with a 10-foot pole, and questioning its accuracy, we could make ourselves main users and use the whole research excercise to help uncover the kinks in the system, if any, and validate and help strengthen such data base.
In reply, I said I can only agree, proposing that we should find ways of (a) estimating the size of that "noise"; (b) sifting out the "noise" from the valid and reliable data; and (c) ensuring that the "noise" is kept to the minimum in subsequent NATs.

Because unless we are able to take out or minimize the "noise," we will be saddled with bad data which will lead to bad decisions. And this Time article will certainly be a recurring déjà vu.
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

The toughest question on education (2)

October 31st, 2006 No comments
WHICHEVER way, I hope the accountability question will also include providing a reliable way of measuring improvement in student achievement, which I raised in this previous post.

I am part of an e-group that includes high-ranking officials from the DepEd, NEDA as well as our leading academic institutions in the country. I pretty much raised the same concern more than a month ago. The only response came from a UNICEF representative who said
You may argue that BEIS [Basic Education Information System] or the NAT [National Achievement Test] results have a lot of "noise" which makes them questionable and not credible. But I wonder which data base is totally free of any such "noise." Even the data supposedly gathered by the graduate students themselves may not be totally free of such problems. But I think this is where people in the academe and those in the reseach field can work more closely with DepED so that there is pressure to improve the integrity of data. Rather than treating the DepED data base with a 10-foot pole, and questioning its accuracy, we could make ourselves main users and use the whole research excercise to help uncover the kinks in the system, if any, and validate and help strengthen such data base.
In reply, I said I can only agree, proposing that we should find ways of (a) estimating the size of that "noise"; (b) sifting out the "noise" from the valid and reliable data; and (c) ensuring that the "noise" is kept to the minimum in subsequent NATs.

Because unless we are able to take out or minimize the "noise," we will be saddled with bad data which will lead to bad decisions. And this Time article will certainly be a recurring déjà vu.
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

The toughest question on education (2)

October 31st, 2006 No comments
WHICHEVER way, I hope the accountability question will also include providing a reliable way of measuring improvement in student achievement, which I raised in this previous post.

I am part of an e-group that includes high-ranking officials from the DepEd, NEDA as well as our leading academic institutions in the country. I pretty much raised the same concern more than a month ago. The only response came from a UNICEF representative who said
You may argue that BEIS [Basic Education Information System] or the NAT [National Achievement Test] results have a lot of "noise" which makes them questionable and not credible. But I wonder which data base is totally free of any such "noise." Even the data supposedly gathered by the graduate students themselves may not be totally free of such problems. But I think this is where people in the academe and those in the reseach field can work more closely with DepED so that there is pressure to improve the integrity of data. Rather than treating the DepED data base with a 10-foot pole, and questioning its accuracy, we could make ourselves main users and use the whole research excercise to help uncover the kinks in the system, if any, and validate and help strengthen such data base.
In reply, I said I can only agree, proposing that we should find ways of (a) estimating the size of that "noise"; (b) sifting out the "noise" from the valid and reliable data; and (c) ensuring that the "noise" is kept to the minimum in subsequent NATs.

Because unless we are able to take out or minimize the "noise," we will be saddled with bad data which will lead to bad decisions. And this Time article will certainly be a recurring déjà vu.
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

The toughest question on education (1)

October 31st, 2006 No comments
COCA-COLA Foundation president and executive director Ma. Cecilia Alcantara's piece in yesterday's Inquirer is indicative of the extra attention being given by the private sector on the state of public education in the Philippines. For once this is a refreshing change, and DepEd Secretary Jesli Lapus's businesslike approach in running the department seems to have inspired renewed confidence.

The new buzzword, Alcantara said, "is the '
57-75' framework, which aims to raise the national achievement average from its present failing level to a passing mark—from 57 percent to 75 percent within the next five years." Aniceto Sobrepeña of the Metrobank Foundation said as much in this article a month ago.

In achieving this goal, former Education Secretary Butch Abad--who continues his work on education governance from the private sector side--is on the ball by asking what I also believe is the toughest question in this growing national effort:
Who becomes accountable for attaining the 75 passing grade? The students? The teachers? The principals? The superintendents? The regional directors? The secretary of education?
Mayor Robredo provided much of the answer when he described the two principles of our school board project: (1) education is a shared community responsibility, which (2) goes together with shared accountability. "That's all of us!" Alcantara exclaimed. "Not just some of us, but every one of us brave and caring enough to want to make a real difference."

Dean Bocobo of course disagrees and sees the centralized, P150B-a-year public system run by DepEd as the main problem, and passionately argues for its privatization in a series of posts that started with this.
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

The toughest question on education (1)

October 31st, 2006 No comments
COCA-COLA Foundation president and executive director Ma. Cecilia Alcantara's piece in yesterday's Inquirer is indicative of the extra attention being given by the private sector on the state of public education in the Philippines. For once this is a refreshing change, and DepEd Secretary Jesli Lapus's businesslike approach in running the department seems to have inspired renewed confidence. The new buzzword, Alcantara said, "is the '57-75' framework, which aims to raise the national achievement average from its present failing level to a passing mark—from 57 percent to 75 percent within the next five years." Aniceto Sobrepeña of the Metrobank Foundation said as much in this article a month ago. In achieving this goal, former Education Secretary Butch Abad--who continues his work on education governance from the private sector side--is on the ball by asking what I also believe is the toughest question in this growing national effort:
Who becomes accountable for attaining the 75 passing grade? The students? The teachers? The principals? The superintendents? The regional directors? The secretary of education?
Mayor Robredo provided much of the answer when he described the two principles of our school board project: (1) education is a shared community responsibility, which (2) goes together with shared accountability. "That's all of us!" Alcantara exclaimed. "Not just some of us, but every one of us brave and caring enough to want to make a real difference." Dean Bocobo of course disagrees and sees the centralized, P150B-a-year public system run by DepEd as the main problem, and passionately argues for its privatization in a series of posts that started with this.
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

The toughest question on education (1)

October 31st, 2006 No comments
COCA-COLA Foundation president and executive director Ma. Cecilia Alcantara's piece in yesterday's Inquirer is indicative of the extra attention being given by the private sector on the state of public education in the Philippines. For once this is a refreshing change, and DepEd Secretary Jesli Lapus's businesslike approach in running the department seems to have inspired renewed confidence.

The new buzzword, Alcantara said, "is the '
57-75' framework, which aims to raise the national achievement average from its present failing level to a passing mark—from 57 percent to 75 percent within the next five years." Aniceto Sobrepeña of the Metrobank Foundation said as much in this article a month ago.

In achieving this goal, former Education Secretary Butch Abad--who continues his work on education governance from the private sector side--is on the ball by asking what I also believe is the toughest question in this growing national effort:
Who becomes accountable for attaining the 75 passing grade? The students? The teachers? The principals? The superintendents? The regional directors? The secretary of education?
Mayor Robredo provided much of the answer when he described the two principles of our school board project: (1) education is a shared community responsibility, which (2) goes together with shared accountability. "That's all of us!" Alcantara exclaimed. "Not just some of us, but every one of us brave and caring enough to want to make a real difference."

Dean Bocobo of course disagrees and sees the centralized, P150B-a-year public system run by DepEd as the main problem, and passionately argues for its privatization in a series of posts that started with this.
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

‘Pusong mamon,’ a prayer and the slighted grandma

October 31st, 2006 No comments
LAST Sunday, my mother-in-law Corazon cut short her intended two-week vacation in Tobog, Oas, Albay after receiving an SOS from her favorite granddaughter Pep.

Just a week back, Lola Oas--as she is called endearingly by our kids, to distinguish her from Yayang, the other lola from Sagrada, Pili--abruptly packed all her belongings and other sentimental stuff, taking several bags to fill in. It was a scene straight from an Anita Linda/Gloria Romero movie: daughter and mom have a 'serious conversation', hurtful words are let loose, mom feels slighted and suddenly wants out.

The turning point came last Saturday as I drove my kids from their monthly youth event at our Kingdom Hall in Banasi. Sofie and Pep spent the rest of the afternoon at Yayang's because Nokie fell asleep. It was already dark when we went back to Pacol.

On the way, they took turns in singing
"Panalangin" ("Prayer"), a revival hit originally sung by the Apo Hiking Society. Then out of the blue, Pep asked me when is her Lola Oas coming back. When Sofie replied she'll be away for another week more, Pep started crying inconsolably. She only stopped when I promised that we will call her Lola and tell her to come home.

Pep's crying resumed when my wife wouldn't make the call. So I texted Tobog, Oas:
"Si Pep sigeng ngawngaw. Haen na daa Lola nya." The reply came in very swiftly: I'll go if you fetch me tomorrow.

So last Sunday off we went to fetch the slighted Lola. On the way back, Pep--my straight-shooting '
pusong mamon' of a daughter, who once teased me why I keep on running away--sang her version of "Panalangin" to her beloved grandma, her eyes filled with joy. Yesterday morning, she obliged me with this repeat performance, and my first stab at YouTube. It's not Pinoy Dream Academy-grade, not worth Jim Paredes's while, but definitely worth keeping, and showing to her Lola whenever she is slighted again.:)
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

‘Pusong mamon,’ a prayer and the slighted grandma

October 31st, 2006 No comments
LAST Sunday, my mother-in-law Corazon cut short her intended two-week vacation in Tobog, Oas, Albay after receiving an SOS from her favorite granddaughter Pep.

Just a week back, Lola Oas--as she is called endearingly by our kids, to distinguish her from Yayang, the other lola from Sagrada, Pili--abruptly packed all her belongings and other sentimental stuff, taking several bags to fill in. It was a scene straight from an Anita Linda/Gloria Romero movie: daughter and mom have a 'serious conversation', hurtful words are let loose, mom feels slighted and suddenly wants out.

The turning point came last Saturday as I drove my kids from their monthly youth event at our Kingdom Hall in Banasi. Sofie and Pep spent the rest of the afternoon at Yayang's because Nokie fell asleep. It was already dark when we went back to Pacol.

On the way, they took turns in singing
"Panalangin" ("Prayer"), a revival hit originally sung by the Apo Hiking Society. Then out of the blue, Pep asked me when is her Lola Oas coming back. When Sofie replied she'll be away for another week more, Pep started crying inconsolably. She only stopped when I promised that we will call her Lola and tell her to come home.

Pep's crying resumed when my wife wouldn't make the call. So I texted Tobog, Oas:
"Si Pep sigeng ngawngaw. Haen na daa Lola nya." The reply came in very swiftly: I'll go if you fetch me tomorrow.

So last Sunday off we went to fetch the slighted Lola. On the way back, Pep--my straight-shooting '
pusong mamon' of a daughter, who once teased me why I keep on running away--sang her version of "Panalangin" to her beloved grandma, her eyes filled with joy. Yesterday morning, she obliged me with this repeat performance, and my first stab at YouTube. It's not Pinoy Dream Academy-grade, not worth Jim Paredes's while, but definitely worth keeping, and showing to her Lola whenever she is slighted again.:)
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

‘Pusong mamon,’ a prayer and the slighted grandma

October 31st, 2006 No comments
LAST Sunday, my mother-in-law Corazon cut short her intended two-week vacation in Tobog, Oas, Albay after receiving an SOS from her favorite granddaughter Pep.

Just a week back, Lola Oas--as she is called endearingly by our kids, to distinguish her from Yayang, the other lola from Sagrada, Pili--abruptly packed all her belongings and other sentimental stuff, taking several bags to fill in. It was a scene straight from an Anita Linda/Gloria Romero movie: daughter and mom have a 'serious conversation', hurtful words are let loose, mom feels slighted and suddenly wants out.

The turning point came last Saturday as I drove my kids from their monthly youth event at our Kingdom Hall in Banasi. Sofie and Pep spent the rest of the afternoon at Yayang's because Nokie fell asleep. It was already dark when we went back to Pacol.

On the way, they took turns in singing
"Panalangin" ("Prayer"), a revival hit originally sung by the Apo Hiking Society. Then out of the blue, Pep asked me when is her Lola Oas coming back. When Sofie replied she'll be away for another week more, Pep started crying inconsolably. She only stopped when I promised that we will call her Lola and tell her to come home.

Pep's crying resumed when my wife wouldn't make the call. So I texted Tobog, Oas:
"Si Pep sigeng ngawngaw. Haen na daa Lola nya." The reply came in very swiftly: I'll go if you fetch me tomorrow.

So last Sunday off we went to fetch the slighted Lola. On the way back, Pep--my straight-shooting '
pusong mamon' of a daughter, who once teased me why I keep on running away--sang her version of "Panalangin" to her beloved grandma, her eyes filled with joy. Yesterday morning, she obliged me with this repeat performance, and my first stab at YouTube. It's not Pinoy Dream Academy-grade, not worth Jim Paredes's while, but definitely worth keeping, and showing to her Lola whenever she is slighted again.:)
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

2nd Raul Roco Day


Mrs. Sonia Roco and members of the late senatorÂ’s family welcome the guests and friends during the celebration.
Categories: Government, Pictures Tags:

In the eye of the storm, literally

October 30th, 2006 No comments
MY VILLAGEMATE and former city hall colleague Senen Ebio prompted me with this most interesting map here. It's a consolidated history of the typhoon paths over the last 50 years in the Asia-Pacific region, courtesy of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

Now I realize why the Philippines has bore the brunt of nature's worst disasters: together with Taiwan and Japan, it practically shields mainland Asia like some sort of a French Maginot Line for the most part--with the exception of some that manage to cut their way through.

And why Mindanao is relatively safe and its people largely unaware of these tempests--like when its delegates during a national DepEd contest in 2004 here cheered when howling winds of Typhoon Yoyong severed the rooftop of the Naga City Sports Complex and sent it flying near their billeting center at the Camarines Sur National High School.

I believe though that recent climactic shifts have occurred, probably due to the El Niño/La Niña phenomenon, as Bicol is no longer brutally punished by these annual visitations as in the past. In fact, I remember the typhoons of my youth twisting with ease the Napocor (now Transco) transmission towers connecting Tiwi to the Luzon grid--something Milenyo for all its damage wrought failed to do.

It will be most interesting to test my thesis with visual typhoon maps aggregated by year, or even every 5 years. I hope OCHA can also make these available online.
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

In the eye of the storm, literally

October 30th, 2006 No comments
MY VILLAGEMATE and former city hall colleague Senen Ebio prompted me with this most interesting map here. It's a consolidated history of the typhoon paths over the last 50 years in the Asia-Pacific region, courtesy of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

Now I realize why the Philippines has bore the brunt of nature's worst disasters: together with Taiwan and Japan, it practically shields mainland Asia like some sort of a French Maginot Line for the most part--with the exception of some that manage to cut their way through.

And why Mindanao is relatively safe and its people largely unaware of these tempests--like when its delegates during a national DepEd contest in 2004 here cheered when howling winds of Typhoon Yoyong severed the rooftop of the Naga City Sports Complex and sent it flying near their billeting center at the Camarines Sur National High School.

I believe though that recent climactic shifts have occurred, probably due to the El Niño/La Niña phenomenon, as Bicol is no longer brutally punished by these annual visitations as in the past. In fact, I remember the typhoons of my youth twisting with ease the Napocor (now Transco) transmission towers connecting Tiwi to the Luzon grid--something Milenyo for all its damage wrought failed to do.

It will be most interesting to test my thesis with visual typhoon maps aggregated by year, or even every 5 years. I hope OCHA can also make these available online.
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags:

In the eye of the storm, literally

October 30th, 2006 No comments
MY VILLAGEMATE and former city hall colleague Senen Ebio prompted me with this most interesting map here. It's a consolidated history of the typhoon paths over the last 50 years in the Asia-Pacific region, courtesy of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

Now I realize why the Philippines has bore the brunt of nature's worst disasters: together with Taiwan and Japan, it practically shields mainland Asia like some sort of a French Maginot Line for the most part--with the exception of some that manage to cut their way through.

And why Mindanao is relatively safe and its people largely unaware of these tempests--like when its delegates during a national DepEd contest in 2004 here cheered when howling winds of Typhoon Yoyong severed the rooftop of the Naga City Sports Complex and sent it flying near their billeting center at the Camarines Sur National High School.

I believe though that recent climactic shifts have occurred, probably due to the El Niño/La Niña phenomenon, as Bicol is no longer brutally punished by these annual visitations as in the past. In fact, I remember the typhoons of my youth twisting with ease the Napocor (now Transco) transmission towers connecting Tiwi to the Luzon grid--something Milenyo for all its damage wrought failed to do.

It will be most interesting to test my thesis with visual typhoon maps aggregated by year, or even every 5 years. I hope OCHA can also make these available online.
Categories: Blogs, Personal Tags: